December 28, 2017

Recipe - Nori Seaweed ›


Savory New Year’s Mochi (a.k.a. Isobeyaki Mochi)

Savory New Year’s Mochi (a.k.a. Isobeyaki Mochi)

We often think of mochi as a sweet treat, but have you ever tried a savory kind? In Japanese culture, rice cakes are a traditional food enjoyed during New Year’s. This version, also known as Isobeyaki Mochi, is nothing more than plain mochi that’s been painted with a sweet soy glaze and then wrapped in crispy nori. A simple recipe, but fantastically delicious!

Savory New Year’s Mochi (a.k.a. Isobeyaki Mochi)

If you live close to a Japanese market, the plain mochi can easily be purchased premade. The store-bought version is called Kirimochi, and comes in hard, individually wrapped pieces. If it’s not easily found, then you can do as I have here and make your own plain (i.e. unsweetened) mochi at home.

Savory New Year’s Mochi (a.k.a. Isobeyaki Mochi)

It’s essential to wrap a rich piece of seaweed around the sweet and salty mochi straight out of the frying pan. Enjoy hot with a cup of Japanese green tea (I prefer a strong one, like Gyokuro here) and you have one exceptionally tasty tea snack. For sweet mochi lovers who haven’t tried a savory version, this is crunchy, chewy creation shouldn’t be missed!

Savory New Year’s Mochi (a.k.a. Isobeyaki Mochi)

 


Savory New Year’s Mochi (a.k.a. Isobeyaki Mochi)

Makes 16 small pieces.

Ingredients:

- Yamamotoyama’s Kiku Ariake nori, to wrap mochi
- 1 Tbsp cooking oil
{Homemade Plain Mochi OR pre-made Kirimochi}
- 2 1/2 cups glutinous rice flour
- 3/4 tsp salt - 1 1/4 cups water
{Sauce}
- 1 Tbsp soy sauce - 1 Tbsp brown sugar

Directions:

1. Make the mochi by mixing all the mochi ingredients together to create a dough. Place this in an 8″ square, greased pan that is microwave safe. Use a spatula to even out the dough in the pan. Microwave on medium-high for 10-12 minutes until just cooked and translucent looking. Let the mochi cool, then cut into 16 pieces.

2. In a small pot, heat the soy sauce with the brown sugar until it dissolves. Remove from the heat and set aside.

3. Heat the oil in a pan over medium-low heat. Pan fry the mochi pieces for 2-3 minutes on each side until golden brown. Brush the mochi with the sweet soy sauce, then wrap with small pieces of nori to serve.


 

 

October 23, 2017

Recipe - Nori Seaweed ›


Thanksgiving Leftovers Temaki

Thanksgiving Leftovers Temaki

Is there any room left in the fridge after last night’s dinner? At this point, I’m guessing that the chill box is chock full of leftovers.

Thanksgiving Leftovers Temaki

This recipe for Thanksgiving Leftovers Temaki is exactly what you need to finish up whatever delicious morsels remain after Turkey Day! This is an East meets West take on sushi hand rolls, an easy and healthy meal or snack to serve alongside a piping hot cup of Japanese tea.

Thanksgiving Leftovers Temaki

For a post-Thanksgiving lunch, it’s common to throw everything onto sandwich bread and call it a day. But if you’re trying to cut back a bit, wrapping the sandwich fillings in crisp, flavorful nori is a nice way to lighten things up.

Thanksgiving Leftovers Temaki

If you haven’t paired nori with bites other than seafood before, you’ll be surprised at how well it complements other ingredients. Most often, temaki are filled with rice and raw fish, but here I’m stuffing them with classic Thanksgiving fare like turkey, sweet potatoes and spinach. As long as you don’t over-stuff, any starch, including dressing or roasted potatoes will also work well here.

Thanksgiving Leftovers Temaki

My favorite tea pairing with these Thanksgiving Leftovers Temaki is a cup of strongly steeped Genmaicha. The savory, slightly sweet notes are perfect for complementing fall holiday flavors. Drink up and get creative with your temaki-making. Just stuff and roll and it’s time to eat (again)!

Thanksgiving Leftovers Temaki

 


Thanksgiving Leftovers Temaki

Ingredients:

- sweet potatoes (or regular potatoes, rice, stuffing…you get the idea!)
- sautéed spinach (or other veggies)
- dried cranberries (or cranberry sauce)
- turkey, shredded
- Yamamotoyama’s Kiku Ariake nori, cut in half, parallel to lines on the sheet
- gravy or cut herbs, to serve

Directions:

1. To assemble the temaki, lay a piece of nori horizontally on a work surface, rough side up. Scoop out 3 Tbsp of the potatoes and place it on the left half of the rectangle. Spread the potatoes out so that it lays in a square. Top the potatoes with spinach, cranberries and strips of turkey. Take the bottom edge of the rectangle and fold it over the ingredients. Continue rolling to form a cone. Seal the cone with a dab of water.

2. To serve, drizzle some gravy or a sprinkling of cut herbs atop the temaki. Enjoy!


 

 

Genmaicha Crusted Salmon with Green Tea Soba

Genmaicha Crusted Salmon with Green Tea Soba

When it comes to cooking with tea, you can easily find recipes where food is either infused or has steeped tea added to it. Less commonly, you’ll find recipes where you can taste tea in its full form, where the tea leaves are actually eaten whole.

Genmaicha Crusted Salmon with Green Tea Soba

In this recipe for Genmaicha Crusted Salmon with Green Tea Soba, tea is used like a spice. If you’re looking for a subtle way to spruce up best-quality wild salmon, this is the recipe for you!

Genmaicha Crusted Salmon with Green Tea Soba

I love serving this salmon with green tea soba for its color and flavor. Tea-infused ponzu broth means that you get a double hit of this delicious toasted brown rice green tea, allowing us to appreciate it in both its dry and steeped forms.

Genmaicha Crusted Salmon with Green Tea Soba

If you prefer less of a tea taste, just serve the salmon with some healthy sides like sprouted brown rice and steamed veggies. A generous squeeze of lemon juice atop the salmon’s golden, crunchy crust and you’ll develop a whole new appreciation for Genmaicha!

Genmaicha Crusted Salmon with Green Tea Soba

 


Genmaicha Crusted Salmon with Green Tea Soba

Serves 2.

Ingredients:

- 2 wild salmon fillets
- 2 Tbsp Yamamotoyama’s Organic Genmaicha tea, loose-leaf
- 1 tsp lemon zest - salt and pepper to taste
- 2 Tbsp butter or olive oil - 1/4 cup ponzu
- 1 cup Genmaicha tea, steeped
- 2 servings of green tea soba, prepared
- Yamamotoyama’s Kiku Ariake nori, to serve

Directions:

1. Place the tea, lemon zest, salt and pepper in a small zip-top bag. Seal shut, then crush the contents well with the bottom of a large skillet.

2. Pat the salmon filets completely dry with some sheets of paper towel. Place the crushed tea mixture on a plate, then crust the skin side of each filet with the dry tea mix. Set aside.

3. In a large skillet, heat the butter or oil over medium high heat. When the butter comes up to temperature, place the fish filets into the skillet, skin side down. Pan-fry for 2-3 minutes on one side, then flip the filets over and cook for another 1-2 minutes. Set aside.

4. Heat the stock and steeped tea to boiling. To serve, distribute the cooked soba between 2 shallow bowls. Place a piece of fish over each of the soba-filled bowls. Pour some prepared ponzu-tea broth in each bowl, directly over the soba, making sure not to disturb the crust on the filets. Garnish with cut nori to serve.


 

 

September 30, 2017

Recipe - Nori Seaweed ›


Almost No-Carb Sushi

Almost No-Carb Sushi

When it comes to sushi, white rice seems like a must-have ingredient. But for those looking for a lighter, less carb-heavy option, Almost No-Carb Sushi is the answer!

Almost No-Carb Sushi

I know what you’re thinking: Almost No-Carb Sushi…what am I thinking! Ok, this is definitely a different take on sushi, but one worth trying if you’re super strict with counting carbs.

Almost No-Carb Sushi

The trick here is to swap out cauliflower bits for starchy white rice. Cream cheese helps the cauliflower to bind and work just like regular rice does.

Almost No-Carb Sushi

Here, I’ve made some California Rolls and Hosomaki, thin rolls that typically only have one filling ingredient. Instead of making the California Rolls with the rice inside out (the way they are typically made), I like to wrap the entire roll in a full-sheet of nori. This enhances the umami-rich flavors, giving a greater proportion of nori in each bite.

Almost No-Carb Sushi

If I happen to have some on hand, I like to add some Japanese powdered sushi vinegar to the faux-rice mix. This ingredient helps the cauliflower to taste more like seasoned sushi rice without making the mixture too wet.

Almost No-Carb Sushi

The cauliflower sticky rice used for this Almost No-Carb Sushi works perfectly for all your sushi-making needs, including maki rolls, onigiri, and onigirazu. Make sure to wrap all your creations with Yamamotoyama’s best-quality Kiku Ariake Nori and you can’t go wrong!

Almost No-Carb Sushi

 


Almost No-Carb Sushi

Makes 32 pieces.

Ingredients:

- 1 Tbsp avocado or vegetable oil
- 16 oz. cauliflower, processed into rice-sized bits
- 1/4 cup cream cheese
- powdered sushi vinegar (optional, to taste)
- 1/4 tsp salt
- 4 full-sheets of Yamamotoyama’s Kiku Ariake Nori
- sushi filling ingredients

Directions:

1. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the cauliflower and stir-fry for 2 minutes.

2. Transfer the cauliflower to a large mixing bowl. Let cool, then mix in the cream cheese, powdered sushi vinegar, and salt. Use the cauliflower sticky rice as you would regular sushi rice, in the same amounts.

3. Place a sheet of nori on a sushi mat, rough side up. Spread out 1 cup of rice on the sheet of nori, leaving a 1/2″ border at the top.

4. Roll the mat upwards holding the filling in with your fingers. Continue rolling up to create a tight roll.

5. Cut each roll into 6 equal pieces by cutting each log in half, then each half into 4 pieces.


 

 

August 22, 2017

Recipe - Nori Seaweed ›


Parmesan Nori Crisps

Parmesan Nori Crisps

Cheese crisps are an ideal snack for low-carb, paleo and keto diets, or for anyone who simply loves the taste of cheese! I love how simple these are to make and how a few do a such fantastic job of satisfying.

Parmesan Nori Crisps

These crisps look like something you’d find in the snack aisle of your local Japanese grocery store. The traditional recipe calls for sprinkling them with fresh herbs like thyme or basil, but for an Asian twist, I love to throw some flavorful strips of nori on top instead.

Parmesan Nori Crisps

The briny taste of seaweed pairs perfectly with the taste of salty cheese. If you haven’t tried this delicious combination, you’re definitely missing out! Shredded Parmesan works great, but if you like a stronger taste, use a blend Parmesan and Romano like I have here.

Parmesan Nori Crisps

I use a pair of herb scissors to cut Yamamotoyama’s Kiku Ariake into thin strips. The taste is much better than using pre-shredded nori or pre-mixed furikake, which is lesser in quality and can make the crisps too salty.

Parmesan Nori Crisps

Use a measuring spoon to create equal piles of cheese on the baking sheet. This will ensure that all the crisps bake up evenly. For a punch of heat, I like to sprinkle the freshly baked crisps with some Asian chili flakes or hot paprika straight out of the oven.

Parmesan Nori Crisps

Parmesan Nori Crisps are delicious with a cup of sweet and savory Hojicha. The crisps keep well for several days so make plenty and store in air-tight containers for easy snacking at a moment’s notice. Easy, healthy and tasty…what’s not to love!?

Parmesan Nori Crisps

 


Parmesan Nori Crisps

Makes 16 crisps.

Ingredients:

- 1 cup of Parmesan, shredded (or a Parmesan & Romano blend)
- sheet of Yamamotoyama’s Kiku Ariake, cut into 1″ x 1/8″ strips
- Asian chili flakes (gochugaru) or paprika

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Place 8- 1 Tbsp piles of cheese on each of 2 baking sheets fitted with parchment or silicone mats, at least 2″ apart. Slightly flatten the piles into flat 2″ rounds with your fingers.

2. Sprinkle some cut nori strips on each of the cheese piles. When the oven has come up to temperature, bake for 6-8 minutes until the cheese is golden brown and crisp.

3. Let the baking sheets cool slightly. When the crisps are cool enough to handle, remove them from the parchment with a thin spatula. If you find that the crisps stick to the parchment, try peeling the parchment away from the bottom of the crisps. Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days.


 

 

July 31, 2017

Recipe - Nori Seaweed ›


Avocado & Sweet Potato Onigiri

Avocado & Sweet Potato Onigiri

I love tea foods that are portable, convenient and nutritious. That's where onigiri come into the picture, those Japanese shaped rice balls that you can jazz up and make your own.

Avocado & Sweet Potato Onigiri

I came up with this recipe for Sweet Potato & Avocado Onigiri the other day when I had way too many avocados getting ripe at the same time. The ingredient list is simple and meatless but super satisfying.

Avocado & Sweet Potato Onigiri

There’s a special twist here that makes these onigiri extra special, and that ingredient is browned butter. The butter chars the outside of the onigiri, giving the brown rice an almost popcorn like taste.

Avocado & Sweet Potato Onigiri

For vegans, just use coconut oil instead of butter. The oil itself won’t brown, but you’ll be able to get a nice golden finish on the outside of each onigiri.

Avocado & Sweet Potato Onigiri

To go along with those popcorn flavors, try enjoying this with Genmaicha, otherwise known as popcorn tea. These Sweet Potato & Avocado Onigiri make a hearty snack, ideal for eating on-the-go or on a summer picnic.

Avocado & Sweet Potato Onigiri

 


Avocado & Sweet Potato Onigiri

Makes 6-8 large onigiri.

Ingredients:

- 1/2 avocado, sliced into 1/4″ pieces
- 1 small sweet potato, roasted & cooled, then sliced into 1/4″ pieces
- 1 cup short grain brown rice
- 2 Tbsp salted butter
- 1 sheet nori, cut into 1 1/2″ x 4″ strips
- chopped chives, to garnish - togarashi, to garnish

Directions:

1. Cook the rice by rinsing it several times, then cooking in 2 cups of water (or according to package instructions). When it has cooked, fluff up the rice in a large bowl and let it come to room temperature.

2. Wet your hands and a onigiri mold in a bowl of water. Add enough rice to the mold to cover the bottom and half way up the sides. Create a bowl-like space to place the fillings. Place 1-2 pieces each of the avocado and sweet potato in the space. Now top with rice to cover the fillings inside.

3. Press the top of the mold into the bottom half to compress the rice ball. Push the rice ball out then wrap a piece of nori around it.

4. Heat the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Wait for the butter to gradually turn a brown color, then grill the onigiri for a few minutes on each side until golden brown. Garnish with chives and togarashi to taste. Best served immediately, with Genmaicha.


 

 

May 23, 2017

Recipe - Nori Seaweed ›


Cucumber Sushi Rolls

Cucumber Sushi Rolls

Cucumber Sushi Rolls, or hosomaki, are my typical pick up at the to-go sushi bar. These one bite rolls make a delicious, light meal during summer months. I love their clean taste and how well they pair with hot or cold green tea.

Cucumber Sushi Rolls

If you’re the type of person who can’t stand long grocery lists, this is the recipe for you! These rolls have very few ingredients in them: cucumbers, nori and rice (and some vinegar, salt and sugar to season the rice). What makes this recipe great is its simplicity.

Cucumber Sushi Rolls

English cucumbers work well here, as do Japanese and Persian cucumbers. Seedless cucumbers with a light crunch and minimal bitterness are ideal. Since they aren’t peeled, try to stay away from any variety that has a tough skin.

Cucumber Sushi Rolls

You can get fancy here by replacing the cucumber with sashimi-grade fish, seaweed salad or a not-too-ripe avocado. The uncomplicated flavors of these Cucumber Sushi Rolls will allow each sip of your favorite tea to shine through.

Cucumber Sushi Rolls

 


Cucumber Sushi Rolls

Makes 48 small rolls.

Ingredients:

- 1 English cucumber, ends removed, seeded (or whatever is left of seeds) and cut lengthwise into 8 long sticks
- 4 cups seasoned sushi rice
- 8 half sheets of nori

Directions:

1. Place a sheet of nori on a sushi mat, rough side up. With wetted hands and a wetted 1/2 cup measure, spread out 1/2 cup of rice on the sheet of nori, leaving a 1/2″ border at the top.

Cucumber Sushi Rolls

2. Roll the mat upwards holding the filling in with your fingers. Continue rolling up to create a tight roll.

3. Cut each roll into 6 equal pieces by cutting each log in half, then each half into 3 pieces. Serve with soy sauce.


 

 

May 17, 2017

Recipe - Nori Seaweed ›


Kale & Shiitake Onigirazu

Kale & Shiitake Onigirazu

What is it about spring and summer that make utensil free foods so appealing? Today I’m making onigirazu, otherwise known as Japanese rice ball sandwiches. Stuffed with kale and Shiitake mushrooms, these are perfect for enjoying as a healthy and portable tea snack.

Kale & Shiitake Onigirazu

Making onigirazu sounds complicated, but it’s really not. The easiest way to make these (and if you make them often) is by acquiring a clever onigriazu maker. If you don’t want to bother with gadgets, just use a measuring cup to make the amount of rice equal on both sides of the filling.

Kale & Shiitake Onigirazu

For better mushroom flavor and texture, both fresh and dried Shiitakes are used here. A generous helping of Lacinato kale and aromatic garlic and shallots make the mushrooms taste that much more hearty.

Kale & Shiitake Onigirazu

Did you notice how rich the color of this brown rice is? The rice looks like it’s been made with beef broth, but the coppery color is actually the result of being cooked in Hojicha tea. Cooking rice with tea adds a beautiful layer of fragrance and also a deep vegetable taste.

Kale & Shiitake Onigirazu

These Kale & Shiitake Onigirazu are super satisfying as a wholesome meatless meal. Plan on making many, as they keep for well for several days (in the fridge). A zap microwave and this delicious tea snack is ready to enjoy!

Kale & Shiitake Onigirazu

 


Kale & Shiitake Onigirazu

Makes 6 onigirazu.

Ingredients:

- 3 Tbsp cooking oil - 6 large Shiitake mushrooms, fresh
- 2-3 large leaves of Lacinato kale, cut into 1″ pieces
- 1 cup Shiitake mushrooms, dried & rehydrated, tough bits removed & squeezed dry
- 1 shallot, minced - 4 cloves garlic, minced
- 1 Tbsp oyster sauce - 1 1/2 tsp soy sauce
- 1 1/2 tsp Worcestershire sauce - 1 tsp sugar
- black pepper, to taste - 2 Tbsp rice wine
- 1 tsp sesame oil - 1 cup brown rice, short grain
- 2 cups hot water @212 degrees F
- 1 rounded Tbsp of Hojicha (I used Yamamotoyama’s Hojicha)
- 6 half-sheets of nori (I used Yamamotoyama’s Kiku Ariake)

 

Equipment:

- skillet - work surface
- onigirazu maker or 1/4 cup measure
- bowl with water - plastic wrap

 

Directions:

1. Steep the tea in 2 cups of boiling water for 5 minutes, then strain out the leaves. Wash the brown rice and cook it with the 2 cups of steeped Hojicha tea.

2. Place a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the oil. When the oil shimmers, add the shallots and garlic and stir fry for 30 seconds. Add all the mushrooms, then stir fry for 1-2 minutes. Add the rice wine and let it cook out.

3. Add the kale and stir fry for a minute. Add the sauces, sugar and pepper, then mix everything together. When the mushrooms are slightly browned and the kale is wilted, turn off the heat. Drizzle the mixture with sesame oil and set it aside to cool slightly.

4. Place a half sheet of nori on a work surface. With wetted hands and a wetted measuring cup, measure out 1/4 cup of rice and place this on the top half of the nori sheet. Slightly pat down into a patty, then place 2 Tbsp of the mushroom filling atop the rice. Finally, place another 1/4 cup of rice atop the filling and slightly pat down into a patty. Refer to the images from my BLT Onigirazu post for instructions on how to wrap. Please note that these Kale & Shiitake Onigirazu are slightly smaller than the BLT ones, made with half sheets of nori instead of full sheets.

5. Wrap the rice ball in the nori so that is it fully enveloped. Place in a piece of plastic wrap and cut with a sharp knife to serve.


 

 

 

 

April 26, 2017

Recipe - Nori Seaweed ›


Nori Rolled Omelette

Nori Rolled Omelette

Nori Rolled Omelettes may look exotic and fanciful, but they’re actually made from the simplest of ingredients. Nori adds a hearty taste and aroma to this egg dish–it’s a lowcarb meal made with artistry and ideal for enjoying next to a cup of hot tea.

Nori Rolled Omelette

The best way to make this is in a square-shaped frying pan. Technically, this pan can be any shape, but the squared edges come in handy for creating an evenly shaped roll where nori is present in each bite.

Nori Rolled Omelette

A 10″ square pan perfectly holds 2 eggs in a very thin layer. Depending on the exact proportions of your pan, you may need to use more or less liquid egg.

Nori Rolled Omelette

When using the nori, try to cover as much surface area as possible. For my 10″ pan, this meant using one full sheet (or 2 half sheets) and an extra strip or 2 of nori. If you keep the nori in a single layer, you’ll end up with a crepe-like, thin roll of egg with a perfect spiral pattern.

Nori Rolled Omelette

Garnish this Nori Rolled Omelette with some chopped herbs, pepper flakes or sesame seeds. To mix things up, even try sprinkling it with cheese or use butter instead of oil. I like to cut the pieces fairly thick so that they can be easily picked up with chopsticks without falling apart.

Nori Rolled Omelette

This omelette makes a fantastic protein rich meal to serve with hot tea, my favorite pairing being with Gyokuro. On a table among other dishes it always steals the show!

Nori Rolled Omelette

 


Nori Rolled Omelette

Makes 1-12″ omelette.

Ingredients:

- 4 full sheets of nori
- 6 eggs
- 1 Tbsp soy sauce
- 1 1/2 tsp sesame oil
- cooking spray

 

Equipment:

10″ non-stick square pan

 

Directions:

1. Crack 2 eggs in a bowl. Add 1 tsp of soy sauce and a 1/2 tsp of sesame oil. Scramble until evenly combined.

2. Mist a 10″ square non-stick pan well with cooking spray. Set atop a low-medium flame. Pour the scrambled egg mixture on the pan and roll the liquid around evenly until the entire surface is covered in egg. Let cook for about a minute until the eggs are lightly set.

3. Lay a single layer of nori on the surface of the semi-cooked egg, trying to cover as much area as possible. You may need to cut one of the pieces of nori to fill in some of the surface area.

4. Take the pan off the heat and onto a heat proof surface. Using a rubber spatula and your fingers, start rolling the omelette upwards, away from you, to create a tight roll, seam side down. Be careful as the egg will be hot. When you have created a roll, slide it down towards the handle of the pan.

5. Spray the pan evenly with oil spray again. Now, repeat steps 1-4.

6. Finally, for a third time, repeat steps 1-4. Carefully remove the omelette from the heat, wait to cool slightly, then cut with a sharp knife to serve.


 

 

March 23, 2017

Recipe - Nori Seaweed ›


Unagi Sushi Burrito

Unagi Sushi Burrito

It sounds cliché, but sometimes the best ideas are the simplest ones. Case in point: Sushi Burritos!

Unagi Sushi Burrito

So what is a Sushi Burrito anyway? It’s basically an uncut sushi roll stuffed more generously and with a little less finesse. That’s the great thing about these…anyone can make them–no precision necessary!

Unagi Sushi Burrito

I’m a huge fan of sashimi and poke, but the hubby isn’t, so unagi is a great ingredient to use here if you don’t prefer raw fish. This sweet and salty broiled eel is glazed with a teriyaki-like sauce, and best of all, you can buy it in stores in the frozen section already pre-made.

Unagi Sushi Burrito

This burrito has very few ingredients, but each is packed with flavor from the sea. Seaweed salad adds a nice sweetness and crunch while ikura, or salmon roe, lends a salty richness. To hold everything together, there’s a crisp, briny sheet of nori.

Unagi Sushi Burrito

As great as this combination is, feel free to play around with the ingredients! I like to choose at least 3 different fillings, with taste, texture and color in mind. For easy serving, wrap these up in parchment and enjoy with your favorite Japanese tea!

Unagi Sushi Burrito


Unagi Sushi Burrito

Makes 2 burritos.

Ingredients:

- 2 cups of seasoned sushi rice
- 1 unagi, baked in a 400 degree F oven for 10 minutes, then cut into 3″ x 1″ strips
- 1/4 cup seaweed salad
- 1/2 cup purple cabbage, shredded
- 2 Tbsp salmon roe
- 2 sheets nori (I used Yamamotoyama’s Kiku Ariake)

 

Directions:

1. Place a sheet of nori shiny side down on a work-surface. With wetted hands, distribute 1 cup of rice evenly on the sheet, leaving a 1/2″ border on the bottom and a 1″ border on the top.

2. Place 2-3 strips of unagi in the center of the rice, then top with 2 Tbsp of seaweed salad, 1/4 cup shredded purple cabbage and 1 Tbsp of salmon roe. Lightly dab the top 1″ border with some water.

3. To create the burrito, take the bottom edge of the nori and gently flip upwards, using your other fingers to keep the fillings tucked in. To seal, flip the Burrito over seam side down.

4. For easy serving, wrap the burrito in a large sheet of parchment paper